Indonesia: Mangroves for life

Indonesia: Mangroves for life

Posted on Jul 30, 2013. Included in Bulletin 192
According to The World’s Mangroves 1980-2005 (FAO 2007), Indonesia has the largest mangrove area in the world in terms of the extent of the region. However, the condition of mangroves has declined both in quality and quantity from year to year. In 1982, Indonesia’s mangrove forests covered an area of 4,25 million ha, while in 2009 it was estimated to be less than 1,9 million ha (KIARA, 2010). For example, according to the “Status of Environment in Indonesia 2009”, issued by the Ministry of Environment, “The mangrove forests in North Sumatra covered 306,154.20 ha, 9.86% of which was in poor condition”. The decline of quality and quantity of mangrove forests has affected the buffer capacity of coastal ecosystems crucial for the survival of coastal species and other marine life, as well as for the survival of coastal communities, because of increased abrasion, reduction in fisheries catches, the intrusion of sea water further inland, the spread of malaria, and so on. On the East coast of Northern Sumatra, the mangrove area decreased by 59.68% from 103,425 ha in 1977 to 41,700 ha in 2006 (Onrizal 2006). Similarly, data for the Sumatra region (2010) mentions that the mangrove forests in the Langkat district were 35,000 ha. Now only 10,000 ha are left in good condition. The decline in quantity and quality is caused by the expansion of oil palm plantations and shrimp farms in coastal areas which besides damaging coastal ecosystems also have a negative impact on the income of traditional fisherfolk. The Sumatra Case Mangrove forest is very important for coastal communities, as is the case of the communities of the East Coast of Langkat district, North Sumatra. In Langkat, 35,000 hectares of mangrove forest stretch along 110 kilometers bordered by the Deli Serdang Regency and East Aceh district, Nanggroe Aceh Darussalam. Only the remaining 10,000 acres are in good condition. Coastal communities are very concerned about the reduction of mangrove forest which not only affects the income of fisherfolk but also makes communities more vulnerable to disasters. In terms of income, for example, fisherfolk have to go further away from the estuary out to the sea to catch fish. The damage to the mangrove ecosystem has been going on since 1980, shortly after the government implemented the expansion of shrimp farms. Spread of diseases affected the quality of shrimp as well as the quality of the coastal environment. Conversion of mangrove forests into oil palm plantations has taken place in almost all coastal areas in Langkat, including Secanggang, Tanjung Pura, Gebang, Babalan, Sei Lepan, Brandan West, Pangkalan Susu, Besitang, and Pematang Jaya, with coastal communities rejecting them. Table I. The extensive damage of mangrove forests in Langkat
No. Sub-district Area (Ha) Area – heavily affected (Ha)
1 Secanggang 9.520 1.125
2 Tanjung Pura 2.750 2.110
3 Gebang 4.959 4.959
4 Babalan 1.700 1.200
5 Sei Lapan 1.200 885
6 Brandan Barat 4.808 4.808
7 Besitang 5.457 5.457
8 Pangkalan Susu 4.876 4.876
9 Pematang Jaya
Total 35.000 25.420
Table 2. Conversion of mangrove forests
No Conversion Results Wide (Ha)
1 Farms/ oil palm plantations 19.750
2 Cutting mangroves 980
3 Damage 3.450
4 Other uses 3.040
Total 25.420
The companies which have been denounced for carrying out practices that have converted mangrove forest into plantations are PT Sari Bumi Mangrove (SBB), PT. Pelita Nusantara Sejahtera (PNS), PT. Marihot, PT. Buana, PT CP, as well as individual representatives from the winning party of the 2009 election. The Indonesian Traditional Fishermen’s Association (KNTI) evaluates that the forest and land rehabilitation program ongoing since 2006-2008 has failed because the practices of mangrove conversion continues to take place on a large scale. Mangrove conversion poses new problems for the fisherfolk and coastal communities of Langkat district, North Sumatra. , including: (1) coastal erosion due to conversion of mangrove ecosystems in the sub-district of Pesisit and Small Island, Langkat district, (2) loss of some places to make a living for coastal communities in the villages of Perlis, Kelanta, Lubuk Kasih, and Pangkalan Batu; (3) increasingly high costs to fisherfolk because the fishermen need to go further out to sea in search of fish, (4) potential increase of conflicts; (5) loss of opportunities to use the land for agriculture, (6) loss of underground water as a source of clean water for 180,000 inhabitants of the Haru Bay community, Langkat, due to water intrusion from the sea, and (7) growing risk for communities from high tides due to the loss of mangrove ecosystems. Mangrove loss In the past two decades, one-third of the mangrove forests have been destroyed in the world. The UK Royal Society, made up of many of the world’s most distinguished scientists, mentioned that the damage has been caused by human activity, particularly the expansion of ponds for shrimp farming. The People’s Coalition for Fisheries Justice (KIARA) estimates that the extent of mangrove forests in Indonesia has drastically shrunk from 4,25 million hectares in 1982 to less than 1,9 million hectares in 2013. Forest degradation has led to loss of flood control and consequently loss of productivity of fisheries and other coastal habitat while further increasing the vulnerability of coastal communities to storms and high waves. As a result, livelihoods become disconnected and drug-addiction in coastal communities has increased. The government -especially the Ministry of Marine Affairs and Fisheries- views nature as a mere commodity for the benefit of a small number of people. The damage to mangrove forests reflects the lack of appreciation of the government for the role played by mangroves. The study of the UK Royal Society found that the damage to mangrove forests caused by the expansion of shrimp farms is not comparable to the losses in well-being of coastal communities and nature. In Thailand, for example, shrimp farms give a profit of US$ 9,632 per ha that only benefit a handful of people. Yet, these farms cause extensive damage, which the Royal Society has put at least at US$ 12,392. While calculations of damage resulting from such activities are to be considered with caution, they indicate that the public bears an enormous cost, not just financially, that outstrips the profit made by a few. Thailand’s experience where gains are privatised and costs borne by the public should guide policies related to the protection against exploitation of important and critical ecosystems like mangroves which, moreover, concern the lives of many people. The three main factors causing damage to mangroves in Indonesia are: First, conversion for aquaculture industry expansion, as is the case in Lampung province. Second, conversion of mangrove forest for urban expansion, as happened in the Gulf of Jakarta, Padang (West Sumatra), Makassar, and Manado (North Sulawesi). Third, damage caused by environmental pollution. Current expansion of oil palm plantations also exacerbates the damage to mangrove ecosystems in Indonesia. As a result of monitoring activities carried out by KIARA, in the district of Langkat, North Sumatra, for example, mangrove conversion to oil palm plantations stretched to a distance of less than 5 meters from the coastline which obviously is not in conformity with the legally required protection of coastal ecosystems in Indonesia. If this trend continues, more massive ecological disaster will occur on the Indonesian archipelago. Mangroves as living space Indonesia, which has one-fifth of the mangroves in the world, is experiencing a process of massive destruction by the aquaculture industry, mainly by shrimp farms, resulting in income loss for local fisherfolk. One of the main threats to the sustainability of fisheries is the destruction of coastal ecosystems, including mangrove forests, which is exacerbated by climate change. The effect is increasing ocean temperatures and ocean acidification, accelerating the process of changes in the condition of aquatic ecosystems. Climate change will alter the distribution and productivity of fish and other marine and freshwater species. This has an impact on the sustainability of fisheries and aquaculture, especially for coastal communities whose livelihoods depend on fishing. Ironically, coastal areas and fishing grounds are now treated as mere commodities. In fact, Japanese companies control the pearl industry; Thailand and Taiwan are already planning to expand the fishing and aquaculture industries; several European entrepreneurs control the marine tourism industry, while the United States, Germany, and Australia promote marine conservation through ‘Blue Carbon’, citing climate change in Indonesia as a need to protect marine areas, resulting in the privatization of traditional fishing grounds and/or coastal areas. Ultimately, the existence of mangrove forests as green belts needs to be protected by strict rules, clearing for shrimp farms must be halted, as well as for industrial plantations, and private tourism in mangrove forests which restrict the rights of traditional fisherfolk and coastal communities. Organizations like the Indonesian Women-fishers’ Fraternity (initiated by KIARA and Alliance for Prosperous Village) have shown that instead, community-driven initiatives through which mangroves can provide income and guarantee the well-being of the local communities help protect mangroves and should be strengthened. By Abdul Halim, General Secretary of The People’s Coalition for Fisheries Justice (KIARA) – Indonesia, e-mail: sobatliem007@gmail.com Sumber: http://wrm.org.uy/wp/blog/articles-from-the-wrm-bulletin/section1/indonesia-mangroves-for-life/

Kiara Desak Presiden Hentikan Utang Luar Negeri

Kiara Desak Presiden Hentikan Utang Luar Negeri

Gloria Natalia Dolorosa Bisnis.com, JAKARTA – Koalisi Rakyat untuk Keadilan Perikanan mendesak Presiden Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono untuk menghentikan skema utang luar negeri dalam penyelenggaraan program konservasi sumber daya laut. Kiara juga mendesak presiden untuk mendukung penuh inisiatif lokal yang telah dijalankan secara turun-temurun oleh 92% nelayan tradisional dan masyarakat adat. Semisal, Sasi di Maluku, Bapongka di Sulawesi Tengah, Panglima Laot di Aceh, Awig-awig di Bali dan Nusa Tenggara, serta Mane’e di Sulawesi Utara. Desakan dirangkum dalam petisi bersama “Lestarikan Laut dengan Kearifan Lokal, Bukan Hutang/Bantuan Asing” yang didukung 123 organisasi dan individu. Menurut siaran pers yang diterima Bisnis, Jumat (2/8/2013), petisi sudah diberikan kepada presiden lewat sekretaris negara. Kementerian Keuangan mencatat hutang Indonesia mencapai Rp2.036 triliun per Mei 2013. Ironisnya, sebagian dana hutang tersebut diperoleh melalui pemasaran sumber daya laut Indonesia ke lembaga finansial internasional, di antaranya program konservasi terumbu karang dan perluasan kawasan konservasi perairan. Pusat Data dan Informasi Kiara, pada Me 2013, mencatat pada periode 2004-2011 hutang luar negeri untuk program Rehabilitasi dan Pengelolaan Terumbu Karang (COREMAP II) mencapai lebih dari Rp1,3 triliun. Sebagian besar bersumber dari hutang luar negeri Bank Dunia dan Bank Pembangunan Asia (ADB). Catatan lain, pemerintah AS memberikan bantuan hibah kepada Indonesia senilai US$23 juta atau Rp235,4 miliar. Rencananya, dana hibah diberikan dalam jangka waktu 4 tahun yang terdiri dari kawasan konservasi senilai US$6 juta dan penguatan industriliasasi perikanan senilai US$17 juta. Ironisnya, dalam pelaksanaan program konservasi terumbu karang justru terbukti gagal atau tidak efektif dan terjadi kebocoran dana berdasarkan Laporan BPK 2013. Salah satunya, penyelewengan dana COREMAP II sebesar Rp11,4 miliar. Indikasi tersebut berdasarkan hasil pemeriksaan BPK pada November-Desember 2012 yang mengidentifikasi kebocoran penggunaan dana COREMAP II. Di samping itu, praktik konservasi laut juga telah memberikan dampak negatif terhadap masyarakat nelayan tradisional. Pusat Data dan Informasi KIARA, Desember 2012, mendapati sedikitnya 20 nelayan tradisional meninggal dunia dan hilang di laut akibat tertembak peluru tajam oleh aparat keamanan di kawasan konservasi laut sejak 1980-2012. Sudah terbukti gagal, pemerintah Indonesia, khususnya Kementerian Kelautan dan Perikanan, malah ingin melanjutkan proyek COREMAP III periode 2014-2019 dengan menambah utang konservasi baru sebesar US$ 80 juta dari Bank Dunia dan ADB. Setali tiga uang, penetapan kawasan konservasi perairan juga memicu konflik horisontal.
Editor : Martin Sihombing Sumber: http://www.bisnis.com/m/kiara-desak-presiden-hentikan-utang-luar-negeri

Pengumuman KIARA Libur Idul Fitri1434 H

Kepada Yth. Pimpinan Organisasi Anggota dan Mitra KIARA   Dalam rangka merayakan Hari Raya Idul Fitri 1 Syawal 1434 Hijriah, KIARA (Koalisi Rakyat untuk Keadilan Perikanan) akan memasuki masa libur mulai  tanggal 6 – 16 Agustus 2013 dan aktif kembali pada tanggal 19 Agustus 2013. Segenap Keluarga Besar KIARA menghaturkan Selamat Hari Raya Idul Fitri 1 Syawal 1434 Hijriah. Semoga kita sanggup menangkap–meminjam penjelasan Yudi Latif–semangat Idul Fitri, yakni semangat persaudaraan universal, bahwa tiap anak manusia terlahir dalam ”kejadian asal yang suci”. Dalam kefitrahan manusia, Tuhan tidak pernah partisan—memihak seseorang atau golongan tertentu—tetapi kualitas keberserahan diri dan amal shaleh- nya. Hanya dengan kemampuan memulihkan kebaikan cinta-kasih dan cinta-moralitas, kepadatan beribadah selama Ramadhan bisa menghadirkan kemenangan sejati. Nabi Muhammad bersabda, ”Maukah aku tunjukkan perbuatan yang lebih baik daripada puasa, shalat, dan sedekah? Kerjakan kebaikan dan prinsip-prinsip yang tinggi di tengah-tengah manusia.” Hormat Kami, Keluarga Besar Koalisi Rakyat untuk Keadilan Perikanan The People’s Coalition for Fisheries Justice Indonesia Perumahan Kalibata Indah Jl. Manggis Blok B Nomor 4 Jakarta 12750, Indonesia Telp./Faks. +62 21 799 3528 Email. kiara@kiara.or.id  

Kado Lebaran untuk SBY Agar Stop Utang Luar Negeri

Kado Lebaran untuk SBY Agar Stop Utang Luar Negeri Oleh Rochmanuddin Liputan6.com, Jakarta : Belasan aktivis yang tergabung dalam Koalisi Rakyat untuk Keadilan Perikanan (Kiara) Kamis (1/8/2013) sore menggelar aksi di depan halaman Istana Merdeka, Jalan Medan Merdeka Utara, Jakarta Pusat. Dalam aksinya, para aktivis ini memberikan kado bingkisan Lebaran kepada Presiden Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono (SBY) yang diserahkan melalui Kantor Sekretaris Negara. Kado ini sebagai simbol kekecewaan terhadap SBY yang berutang kepada asing. “Yang paling pokok, bingkisan kado Lebaran ini sebagai bentuk upaya untuk mendesak Presiden SBY untuk menghentikan utang luar negeri,” ujar Sekretaris Jenderal Kiara Abdul Halim kepada Liputan6.com di lokasi aksi , Kamis (1/8/2013). Dalam bingkisan simbolik tersebut, berisi petisi bersama bertema Lestarikan Laut dengan Kearifan Lokal, Bukan Uutang atau Bantuan Asing. Petisi ini sebelumnya telah diluncurkan selama 21 hari sejak 11 hingga 31 Juli 2013 melalui jejaring media sosial. Sedikitnya 124 organisasi dan individu telah memberi dukungan. Dituturkan Halim, kado yang dirangkai di atas keranjang rotan berisi buku keputusan Mahkamah Konstitusi atas uji materi UU Nomor 27 Tahun 2007 tentang Pengelolaan Wilayah Pesisir dan Pulau kecil. Halim menegaskan, bingkisan ini sebagai upaya untuk menunjukkan penetapan konservasi laut sudah menelan banyak korban nelayan tradisional dan masyarakat adat. Dan ironisnya, akan ada target lahan konservasi seluas kawasan 20 juta hektare. “Sekarang sudah mencapai 15,7 juta hektare. Hampir di seluruh pesisir laut Indonesia. Korban terbanyak terjadi di Indonesia bagian timur misalnya praktek yang terjadi di Sasi Maluku, Bapongka Sulawesi Tengah, Panglima Laot Aceh, Awing-Awing Bali, Nusa Tenggara dan Mane’e Sulawesi Utara,” tutur Halim. Berdalih Konservasi Selain memberikan hadiah kepada SBY, aksi ini juga bertujuan mendesak SBY agar menghentikan utang luar negeri yang berdalih konservasi perikanan dan kelautan. “Tujuan aksi ini kami ingin mendesak SBY untuk menghentikan utang dengan dalih praktik konservasi sumber daya laut,” ujar Halim. Halim menjelaskan, berdasar catatan Pusat Data dan Informasi Kiara pada Mei 2013, periode 2004 hingga 2011 hutang luar negeri untuk program rehabilitasi dan pengelolaan terumbu karang (Coremap II) mencapai lebih dari Rp 1,3 triliun. “Sebagian besar sumbernya dari utang luar negeri Bank Dunia dan Bank Pembangunan Asia (ADB),” imbuhnya. Catatan lain, lanjut Halim, Pemerintah Amerika Serikat memberikan bantuan hibah kepada Indonesia senilai US$ 23 juta atau Rp 235,4 miliar. Rencananya, dana hibah itu akan diberikan dalam jangka waktu 4 tahun. Terdiri dari kawasan konservasi senilai US$ 6 juta dan penguatan industrialisasi perikanan senilai US$ 17 juta. Halim melihat ini sebagai intervensi pihak asing atas kedaulatan Negara Kesatuan Republik Indonesia atas sumber daya lautnya. Karena sebenarnya, masyarakat Indonesia sudah memiliki model pengelolaan sumber daya laut atau konservasi sejak berabad-abad silam. Tuntutan Karenanya, lanjut Halim, Kiara menuntut 2 hal kepada SBY. Pertama agar segera menghentikan skema utang luar negeri dalam penyelenggaraan program konservasi sumber daya laut. Kedua, memberikan dukungan penuh terhadap inisiatif lokal yang telah dijalankan turun-temurun oleh 92 persen nelayan tradisional dan masyarakat adat Halim menambahkan, masyarakat Indonesia khususnya nelayan tradisional dan masyarakat adat sudah memiliki model tersendiri dalam pengelolaan konservasi. “Masyarakat kita sudah melakukan itu, jangan kejar pencitraan internasional,” ujarnya. Dengan dana utang itu, Halim menilai, akan berimplikasi terhadap kerusakan tatanan kehidupan yang sudah ada sejak lama. “Karena lewat iming-iming kepada masyarakat mereka pada ribut, saling bertengkar,” ujarnya. “Atas nama perubahan iklim, stok ikan berkurang, terumbu karang mengalami pemutihan, dengan isu tersebut Indonesia ingin dapat pengakuan. Padahal kami sudah telusuri, baik eksosistemnya, justru yang ada ini merusak,” pungkas Halim. (Ali/Sss) Sumber: http://news.liputan6.com/read/655789/kado-lebaran-untuk-sby-agar-stop-utang-luar-negeri

KIARA Serahkan Petisi Desak Penghentian Utang Konservasi dan Dukung Kearifan Lokal Mengelola Sumber Daya Laut ke Presiden SBY

Siaran Pers Koalisi Rakyat untuk Keadilan Perikanan www.kiara.or.id  

KIARA Serahkan Petisi Desak Penghentian Utang Konservasi

dan Dukung Kearifan Lokal Mengelola Sumber Daya Laut ke Presiden SBY

Jakarta, 1 Agustus 2013. Koalisi Rakyat untuk Keadilan Perikanan (KIARA) menyerahkan Petisi Bersama “Lestarikan Laut dengan Kearifan Lokal, Bukan Hutang/Bantuan Asing” kepada Presiden Republik Indonesia melalui Sekretaris Negara di Jl. Veteran No. 17–18, Jakarta 10110. Petisi yang diluncurkan selama 21 hari (11-31 Juli 2013) melalui media jejaring sosial, telah didukung sedikitnya 123 organisasi dan atau individu. Kementerian Keuangan mencatat hutang Indonesia mencapai Rp 2.036 triliun per Mei 2013. Ironisnya, sebagian dana hutang tersebut diperoleh melalui pemasaran sumber daya laut Indonesia ke lembaga finansial internasional, di antaranya program konservasi terumbu karang dan perluasan kawasan konservasi perairan. Sebagaimana sudah dilansir oleh Pusat Data dan Informasi KIARA (Mei 2013) bahwa: pertama, pada periode 2004-2011 hutang luar negeri untuk program Rehabilitasi dan Pengelolaan Terumbu Karang (COREMAP II) mencapai lebih dari Rp1,3 triliun, sebagian besarnya bersumber dari hutang luar negeri Bank Dunia dan Bank Pembangunan Asia (ADB); dan kedua, Pemerintah AS memberikan bantuan hibah kepada Indonesia senilai USD 23 juta atau Rp. 235,4 Miliar. Rencananya, dana hibah diberikan dalam jangka waktu empat tahun yang terdiri dari kawasan konservasi senilai USD 6 juta dan penguatan industriliasasi perikanan senilai USD 17 juta. Ironisnya, dalam pelaksanaan program konservasi terumbu karang justru terbukti gagal/tidak efektif dan terjadi kebocoran dana berdasarkan Laporan BPK 2013. Salah satunya adalah penyelewengan dana COREMAP II sebesar Rp11, 4 Miliar. Indikasi tersebut berdasarkan Hasil Pemeriksaan BPK di bulan November-Desember 2012, yang mengidentifikasi kebocoran penggunaan dana COREMAP II. Di samping itu, praktek konservasi laut juga telah memberikan dampak negatif terhadap masyarakat nelayan tradisional. Pusat Data dan Informasi KIARA (Desember 2012?) mendapati sedikitnya 20 orang nelayan tradisional meninggal dunia dan hilang di laut akibat tertembak peluru tajam oleh aparat keamanan di kawasan konservasi laut sejak 1980-2012. Sudah terbukti gagal, Pemerintah Indonesia (baca: Kementerian Kelautan dan Perikanan) malah ingin melanjutkan proyek COREMAP III periode 2014-2019 dengan menambah utang konservasi baru sebesar US$ 80 juta dari Bank Dunia dan ADB. Setali tiga uang, penetapan kawasan konservasi perairan juga memicu konflik horisontal. Atas fakta-fakta tersebut di atas, KIARA mendesak Presiden Republik Indonesia untuk: (1) Menghentikan skema utang luar negeri dalam penyelenggaraan program konservasi sumber daya laut; (2) Memberikan dukungan penuh terhadap inisiatif lokal yang telah dijalankan secara turun-temurun oleh 92 persen nelayan tradisional dan masyarakat adat, seperti Sasi di Maluku, Bapongka di Sulawesi Tengah, Panglima Laot di Aceh, Awig-awig di Bali dan Nusa Tenggara, serta Mane’e di Sulawesi Utara.*** Untuk informasi lebih lanjut, dapat menghubungi: Abdul Halim, Sekretaris Jenderal KIARA di +62 815 53100 259